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Category Archives: Glimpse of the past

London Taxis in 1960

Back in 1960, the Rank Organisation’s ‘Look at Life’ division (which created short, factual films for cinemas across the UK) made a documentary focusing on London’s famous black taxis.

taxi-taxi

In nostalgic terms this short film is a real treat. Here are some highlights:

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The opening sequence features a traditional horse-drawn hansom cab trotting over Waterloo Bridge. The cab was driven by Fred Jones who, then aged 75, was old enough to have embarked upon his career long before the combustion engine took over. London’s last horse-drawn cab was withdrawn in 1947.

hansom-cab

According to the film, in 1960 there were “about 6,000 taxis in London.” In 2017 that figure now stands at around 25,000, alongside approximately 115,000 private hire cars. The narrator also informs us that in 1960 there were 2,000 less cabs than before the war- a subtle reminder of the impact WWII had on the trade.

taxi

One of the older incarnations of the Public Carriage Office (the body responsible for regulating the capital’s taxis) can be glimpsed in the film. In those days it was based at 109 Lambeth Road, moving to Islington’s Penton Street a few years later in 1966. The office is now located in Southwark.

pco

In the early 1960s Knowledge students tended to explore London on bicycles. Mopeds are now the vehicle of choice.

pedalling

Although this was filmed in the early 1960s, the Knowledge school I attended looked pretty similar to this; big maps, books spread out and lots of anxious students. The school featured here was run by the Royal British Legion for ex-servicemen and was based on Kennington Oval. According to the film, the course took one year in 1960… today the average time to complete The Knowledge is at least four times that.

school

Tough driving tests are still required today. Luckily I didn’t have to suffer an audience when I took mine.

taxi-test

In 1960 there was a lovely mix of old taxi models on the road.

taxi-mix

In this modern day and age with everybody glued to apps, London cabbies are often unfairly accused of being ‘dinosaurs’ (even though we had a taxi app long before a certain American multinational started splashing its billions about). But as this film shows, cabbies were embracing technology almost 60 years ago by utilising mobile radio units- quite a feat back then.

radio-book

On older cabs built in the 1940s and 50s (such as the Austin FX3) luggage compartments were open to the elements meaning suitcases could get quite soggy in wet weather. In the winter, this also meant cabbies had to wrap up warm.

open-cab

Like today, many cabbies rented their taxis from a garage in the early 60s…. and I must say it looked like the fleets ran a far slicker operation back then. A daily wash and check up for your vehicle, a welfare section, a sports club, cafeteria and a free ride home- that’s the sort of service we can only dream of nowadays.

cab-wash

When this documentary was made, taxi driver identity badges were huge with little change in design since the Victorian era. No wonder Charles Dickens once claimed the large brass labels made cabbies look as if they’d been “catalogued in some collection of rarities.”

badge

Until the 1980s, taxi meters were mechanical and, as shown in the documentary, they had to go through vigorous testing at the National Physical Laboratories before being allowed on the road. 

meters

At the end of the film, we’re told that “Tips are going up these days, the average is between a shilling and two bob.” Hmm…I wouldn’t quite say that’s the case in 2017!

look-at-life-end

To watch the full film, please click below…

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Glimpse of the past… John Lennon on Broadwick Street, 1966

John Lennon, Broadwick Street, November 1966

John Lennon, Broadwick Street, November 1966

36 years ago today, on the 8th December 1980, John Lennon was shot dead in New York. He was  just 40 years old. The image above was taken on the 27th November 1966 outside a public lavatory on Soho’s Broadwick Street, and shows John playing London’s swankiest toilet attendant in a sketch for the BBC comedy show, ‘Not Only But Also‘.

Glimpse of the past… John Logie Baird at Selfridges, March 1925

John Logie Baird at Selfridges, March 1925 (image: BBC)

John Logie Baird at Selfridges, March 1925 (image: BBC)

This wonderful image depicts John Logie Baird– the genius Scotsman who invented television- demonstrating an early prototype of his groundbreaking device in the electrical section of Selfridges department store, Oxford Street in 1925.

Cobbled together from a soapbox, cardboard discs and various bicycle bits, this primitive ‘televisor‘ was only capable of beaming eerie, static images onto a tiny receiving screen. Nevertheless, it was a success and marked the world’s first public demonstration of the fledgling technology.

Just a few years later, Selfridges would go on to sell the very first television sets- which cost as much a brand new motor car at the time. You can read more about John Logie Baird’s London here.

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